News / View previously hidden details of your family’s health in 1911

View previously hidden details of your family’s health in 1911

6 January, 2012

We’ve just published the ‘infirmity’ column of the 1911 census on findmypast.co.uk. If your ancestors completed this part of their census return, you’ll be able to see fresh information about your family’s illnesses and conditions in 1911.

Under data protection regulations, this potentially sensitive information had to remain hidden until now – we’ve just made it available for the first time.

It’s possible to discover really detailed information about your family’s health. The census image below shows Elizabeth Eleanor Thorp from Yorkshire who is recorded as having ‘one eye removed in 1907 for disease (gout)‘ – click the image to enlarge it.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Other examples we’ve found in the infirmity column show that our ancestors weren’t afraid to reveal their quirks and eccentricities: ‘A taste for drink combined with gout’, ‘stron and hearty would like to be married’ and ‘sound as a bell thank god’.

We have also just revealed any recorded details of children born to women in prison who were aged three or under at the time of the census.

Until 31 January 2012, we’re offering you the chance to view the 1911 census at hugely reduced prices. View a 1911 census original image for 10 credits (previously 30) and a transcript for 5 credits (previously 10).

Any 1911 census images and transcriptions you viewed on findmypast.co.uk from 1 December 2010 will be free to view again. This is because, following feedback from many of you, we made it possible to save the records that you’d already viewed from 1 December 2010. You’ll need to re-view any 1911 census records you looked at before this date. Make sure you take advantage of our reduced prices until 31 January 2012 – why wait?

Search the 1911 census now

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  • Boo

    Close, but no coconut. The missing images from Chopwell, though the transcriptions now seem to be turning up in the database STILL do not have the images showing at all.PN 30525; RD 557; SD4; ED18; SN200, brings up “Image error The image you are requesting is currently unavailable. Please contact support or try again later”

    I have done both, still no change.

    12 months and counting and still these images are missing :-(

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003405405105 Prakash

      thanks, SLIXTA, for all the faves! i apirecpate it.

    • http://yqlbxwdmsdga.com/ dhassqdnbe

      UfC0xr htttaiyxxqup

  • Sue

    “Any 1911 census images and transcriptions you viewed on findmypast.co.uk from 1 December 2010 will be free to view again. This is because, following feedback from many of you, we made it possible to save the records that you’d already viewed from 1 December 2010.”

    I can’t find anything on the site about HOW to view previously-viewed images for free. Please tell us how to do it – especially those of us with large extended families who may have viewed hundreds of images in the past 12 months!!

  • Patick OBrien

    The fact that you charge anything for the 1901 or the 1911 census is a travesty. The national archives offers it for free. It is indicative of how you regard your subscribers. It is helpful, of course, to know what kind of organization you really are.

    Pat oBrien

    • Boo

      Maybe now you could see it for free at the NA (you couldn’t previously as the confidential information is on the originals and the rules said it couldn’t be seen till now).
      BUT factor in the cost to get there to look and, for the majority of people, the subscription charge for FMP looks very reasonable indeed.

  • http://www.oliverpereira.co.uk/ Oliver Pereira

    Sue: You can view previously viewed images for free the same way that you viewed them the first time. Search for the record you want, using the search form. In the list of results, a little, blue-outlined star will appear to the right of any image that you have viewed from 01 Dec 2010 onwards. Click “VIEW”, and you can view it again.

    Patick OBrien: What rot. I’ve just checked the website of The National Archives. It says: “The work of putting these records online has been carried out by our partners. It is free to search their websites, but there may be a charge to view full transcriptions and download documents.”

    So no, The National Archives do not provide the 1911 census online free, either.

    I find it absurd that you think findmypast.co.uk should do. They are a business. I shudder to think how many person-hours of work went into the imaging, transcribing, and uploading of the – literally – millions of pages of information. And all the people who did that have to be paid. Or do you think there should be a vast army of slaves toiling away with no reward, just so you can freely wallow in the fruits of their labours without even having to leave your seat? Words can barely express the ludicrousness of your complaint.

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    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003405406989 Olcay

      Ciao, sono asimnimtratore di un gruppo chiamato . Ci farebbe piacere aggiungere l’elemento al gruppo.bella macro, bella la luce ed i dettagli

  • yvonne

    have just tried to find my ancestors on 1911 census, tried several and keeps saying no results,am searching welsh ancestry, so whats the problem

  • Andrew

    … any image that you have viewed from 01 Dec 2010 onwards …

    Why was this date chosen? I did my initial research earlier than this. Why can’t I re-view the records I paid for?

    • http://www.findmypast.co.uk jessmoore

      Hi Andrew,

      1 December 2010 was the date we started to save the records that people had viewed on the site. Lots of you told us this was an important feature, so we introduced it to make your research that bit easier! This makes it impossible for you to view the records you looked at before 1 Dec 2010 again for free.

      Hope this helps.

      Jess (findmypast.co.uk editor)